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Seven Heaven? Hi Liam, Can you expound on the 7th chord, the dominant 7th, the flat 7th? I'm kinda lost when I hear you mention. Thanks
In All Things Harmonica
Seven Heaven? Hi Liam, Can you expound on the 7th chord, the dominant 7th, the flat 7th? I'm kinda lost when I hear you mention. Thanks
In All Things Harmonica
Liam Ward
Apr 22, 2022
Hi cuxolalob, OK, so to answer this I'm going to copy and adapt some stuff I said in another thread with Paula. The terms I, IV, and V chord just tell you the starting point for building each chord. So the I, IV and V start on the first, fourth or fifth degree of the scale respectively. For example in the key of C, C is the I chord, F is the IV and G is the V (because if you count through the C scale - 1. C, 2. D, 3. E, 4. F, 5. G, 6. A, 7. B). All this tells you is the "root" - the note upon which the chord is built. But what about the actual type of chord itself? The C/F/G chord could be major, minor or any number of different types of chord depending on what other notes are used to fill it out. Blues uses a lot of dominant seventh chords - these are often just called "seventh chords" so the two terms are used interchangably in the context of blues music. To build a seventh chord, you combine the root (first note of the scale) with the third and fifth notes of the scale, and then you add a flattened version of the seventh note of the scale (take the seventh note and go down a halfstep). So a C seven chord (written C7) will contain C, E, G and Bb. This is a really "bluesy" chord because it creates tension between the major and minor. That top note (the "flat seventh") creates that tension. So: Dominant seventh chord - chord used in blues containing root, 3, 5, and flat 7. Seventh chord - shortened name commonly used for dominant seventh chord. Flat seven - the seventh degree of a scale flattened a halfstep. Used in a seventh chord to add tension which is great for blues. I hope that makes sense! You might also find the Music Theory course useful.
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